Category Archives: Ships

Rating System for Ships

In the rating system of the British Royal Navy, a third rate was a ship of the line which from the 1720s mounted between 64 and 80 guns, typically built with two gun decks (thus the related term two-decker). Years of experience proved that the third rate ships embodied the best compromise between sailing ability (speed, handling), firepower, and cost. So, while first-rates and second-rates were both larger and more powerful, the third-rate ships were in a real sense the optimal configuration.

San Juan Nepomuceno

Rating

When the rating system was first established in the 1620s, the third rate was defined as those ships having at least 200 but not more than 300 men; previous to this, the type had been classified as “middling ships”. By the 1660s, the means of classification had shifted from the number of men to the number of carriage-mounted guns, and third rates at that time mounted between 48 and 60 guns. By the turn of the century, the criteria had grown and third rate carried more than 60 guns, with second rates having between 90 and 98 guns, while first rates had 100 guns or more, and fourth rates between 48 and 60 guns. By the latter half of the 18th century, they carried between 500 and 720 men.

This designation became especially common because it included the seventy-four gun ship, which eventually came to be the most popular size of large ship for navies of several different nations. It was an easier ship to handle than a first- or second-rate ship, but still possessed enough firepower to potentially destroy any single opponent other than a three-decker. It was also cheaper to operate.A painting of HMS Melville (1817), a British third-rate

By the end of the 18th century, ships of the line were usually categorized directly by their number of guns, the numbers even being used as the name of the class, as in “a squadron of three 74s”, but officially the rating system continued until the end of the Age of Sail, only undergoing a modification in 1817.

Note that the use of terms like “third-rate” in literature can lead to confusion: The French Navy had a different system of five rates or rangs, but some British authors use the Royal Navy’s rating of “third rate” when speaking of a French 74.

HMS Hotspur

Horatio Hornblower Ship


HORNBLOWER
HORNBLOWER

HMS Hotspur

Hotspur.jpg
The HMS Hotspur

You know that Hotspur is under my command?“―Horatio Hornblower[src]

HMS Hotspur was an 20-gun, quarter-deck, ship-rigged sloop-of-war of the British Royal Navy. She was armed with 20 9-pounder long guns.

History

In May of 1803, with war with France under Napoleon Bonaparte imminent, Horatio Hornblower was promoted from Lieutenant to Commander and appointed to command the Hotspur. He chose Lieutenant William Bush to serve under him as First Lieutenant. The ship gave formal salute to the French frigate Loire before war is declared.

Hotspur reconnoitred the approaches to the French naval base of Brest as part of the Inshore Squadron, and narrowly avoided capture when war was declared. While in command of the Hotspur, Admiral William Cornwallis instructed Hornblower to capture a convoy of ships carrying Spanish gold. Instead, Hornblower engaged an enemy frigate sent to warn the convoy and keeps it from accomplishing its mission. Eventually, through superior seamanship and skill, he drove it away.

In the Hornblower TV seriesHotspur was originally a British ship. She was eventually captured by the French. Hornblower found the Hotspur on patrol, and felt something was not right. After Hornblower and the crew discovers that the ship has been captured, they succeed in retaking it by boarding.

HMS Hotspur – Horatio Hornblower Series

You know that Hotspur is under my command?“―Horatio Hornblower

HMS Hotspur was an 20-gun, quarter-deck, ship-rigged sloop-of-war of the British Royal Navy. She was armed with 20 9-pounder long guns.

The Earl of Pembroke was used for the HMS Hotspur

History

In May of 1803, with war with France under Napoleon Bonaparteimminent, Horatio Hornblower was promoted from Lieutenant to Commander and appointed to command the Hotspur. He chose Lieutenant William Bush to serve under him as First Lieutenant. The ship gave formal salute to the French frigate Loire before war is declared.

Hotspur reconnoitred the approaches to the French naval base of Brest as part of the Inshore Squadron, and narrowly avoided capture when war was declared. While in command of the Hotspur, Admiral William Cornwallisinstructed Hornblower to capture a convoy of ships carrying Spanish gold. Instead, Hornblower engaged an enemy frigate sent to warn the convoy and keeps it from accomplishing its mission. Eventually, through superior seamanship and skill, he drove it away.

In the Hornblower TV seriesHotspur was originally a British ship. She was eventually captured by the French. Hornblower found the Hotspur on patrol, and felt something was not right. After Hornblower and the crew discovers that the ship has been captured, they succeed in retaking it by boarding.

Crew

  • Cummings, Midshipman
  • James Doughty, Captain’s Steward
  • Downes, Seaman
  • John Grimes, Captain’s Steward
  • Gurney, Gunner
  • Hewitt, Captain’s Coxswain
  • Huffnell, Purser
  • Jenkins, Seaman
  • James Johnson, Seaman
  • Martin, Captain’s Clerk
  • Mayne, Boatswain’s Mate
  • Sanderson, Seaman
  • Simmonds, Ship’s Cook
  • Dr. Wallis, Surgeon
  • Young, Midshipman

Horatio Hornblower Ships

Captain Pellew’s ship, HMS Indefatigable, is represented by the Grand Turk, a modern replica of the frigate HMS Blandford built in 1741. To represent Hornblower’s ship, HMS Hotspur, the Earl of Pembroke, a civilian ship, underwent some conversion. The Baltic trading schooner Julia and the brig Phoenix of Dell Quay were used to represent the smaller vessels. No real 74-gun ship existed any longer at the time of production (the last one, HMS Implacable, was scuttled in 1949), so HMS Justinian and HMS Renown had to be recreated as models. For the first series a quarter of a 74-gun ship (one exterior side and three open sides to shoot live action on several decks) called the pontoon was built. Later live action on the quarterdeck or the gundeck below was shot on the actual HMS Victory. Eleven scale models, ranging from 4.5 to 7 m in length, were used for the battle scenes, the largest weighing 1400 kg, and made with working rigging and cannons that were fired by remote control. Shooting locations included the Black Sea, the Livadia Palace, Portugal, and the former administration (Melville) building of the Royal William Yard and the Barbican, Plymouth in England.

 

Earl of Pembroke representing HMS Hotspur
Phoenix (1929)